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  • South Dakota Treatment Facility Breakdown by Type:
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The state of South Dakota struggles with the serious problem of alcohol addiction and alcoholism. Alcohol addiction causes destruction anywhere it exists, and this is no exception in the communities of South Dakota. The need for alcohol rehab and alcohol treatment in the area has never been greater.

Alcohol rehabs in South Dakota gives individuals who are struggling with alcohol addiction and alcoholism a new lease on life. Treatment offers individuals the opportunity to make a real change that can be lasting. With the help of specialists and peer support, individuals will be able to discover how they became addicted to alcohol in the first place. They can then avail themselves of the life tools offered in an alcohol rehab, and use them to prevent similar situations in the future. Effective alcohol treatment and alcohol rehab in South Dakota gives individuals the power to make the right choices in their lives.

For long-term alcoholics in South Dakota, physical withdrawal is highly likely when they suddenly quit drinking alcohol. Withdrawal is nothing to downplay, and can be an extremely tough and painful process to go through. In rare cases withdrawal can be fatal. It is important that individuals in South Dakota who want to quit drinking seek treatment and get the help they need through this process. An alcohol rehab can successfully get them through withdrawal and onto their next steps of treatment.

Alcohol Rehab Programs in South Dakota vary depending on individual circumstances. Alcohol Rehab and treatment options in South Dakota include Long-term Alcohol Rehabilitation Programs, Outpatient Alcohol Rehabs, Short-term Alcohol Rehab Centers, Inpatient Alcohol Rehabilitation Facilities, support group meetings, alcohol counseling, halfway houses and sober living.

Put an end to the destructive cycle of alcohol addiction and alcoholism today. Seek alcohol treatment and rehabilitation in South Dakota today, before it is too late.


South Dakota alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. In South Dakota, the most alcohol-related fatalities were reported in 1983 and - twenty years later - in 2003, with 98, which represents 56% of the total traffic fatalities in 1983 and 48% in 2003. The number of alcohol related fatalities reached their lowest point in 2008, with 41 reported. The percentage of traffic fatalities that were alcohol related went from a high of 61% in 1982, to a low of 34% in 2008. Also in 2008, out of all traffic fatalities, 36% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher, down from 29% in 1982.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the South Dakota, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). It is important to note that the South Dakota drunk driving statistics, as shown below, include data from individuals who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or bicyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value."

The fatality rates shown below refer to the number of people killed in all traffic accidents and, separately, in alcohol related traffic accidents, per 100 million vehicle miles traveled. All 50 states in the US now apply two statutory offenses to driving under the influence of alcohol. The first (and original) offense is known either as driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated/impaired (DWI), or operating [a motor vehicle] while intoxicated/impaired (OWI). This is based upon a South Dakota police officer's observations (driving behavior, slurred speech, the results of a roadside sobriety test, etc.) The second offense is called "illegal per se", which is driving with a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Since 2002 it has been illegal in all 50 states to drive with a BAC that is 0.08% or higher.

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

148

90

61

82

55

1983

175

98

56

93

53

1984

143

86

60

72

50

1985

130

73

56

69

53

1986

134

74

55

65

48

1987

134

68

51

59

44

1988

147

73

50

65

44

1989

152

84

55

76

50

1990

153

81

53

74

49

1991

143

64

45

64

45

1992

161

78

48

68

42

1993

140

61

43

57

41

1994

154

76

49

69

44

1995

158

72

45

66

42

1996

175

72

41

59

34

1997

148

62

42

49

33

1998

165

68

41

60

36

1999

150

66

44

59

39

2000

173

83

48

74

43

2001

171

85

50

74

43

2002

180

92

51

79

44

2003

203

98

48

90

44

2004

197

86

44

76

39

2005

186

80

43

76

41

2006

191

78

41

69

36

2007

146

54

37

45

31

2008

119

41

34

34

29



2003-2004 South Dakota Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

10.2%

[3rd of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

16.9%

[13th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

58.3%

[21st of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

3.7%

[43rd of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

86

[40th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

1.108 per 10,000 people

[4th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

44%

[9th of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

57.35%

[10th of 51]

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in South Dakota?

  • Non-commercial drivers in South Dakota age 21+ are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles in South Dakota are legally drunk when their blood alcohol concentration is .04 percent or greater. In South Dakota, school bus drivers are commercial drivers.
  • Drivers under 21 in South Dakota are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .02 or more.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in South Dakota

  • A first-time offender in South Dakota faces up to one year in prison, a fine of up to $2,000, or both. The driver's license revocation period is 30 days to one year. A first-time offender whose BAC measured .17 or more must undergo a court-ordered evaluation to determine chemical dependency. The offender must pay the cost of the evaluation.
  • A driver who commits a second DUI in South Dakota within 10 years of the first offense faces up to one year in prison, a fine of up to $2,000, or both. The driver's license revocation period is at least one year.
  • A driver who commits a third DUI in South Dakota within 10 years faces up to two years in prison, a fine of up to $4,000, or both. The driver's license revocation period is at least one year.
  • A driver who commits a fourth offense in South Dakota within 10 years faces up to five years in prison, a fine of up to $10,000, or both. The driver's license revocation period is at least two years.
  • A driver who commits a fifth or subsequent DUI in South Dakota within 10 years faces up to 10 years in prison, a fine of up to $20,000, or both. The driver's license revocation period is at least three years.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties that may apply under South Dakota's DUI laws, a commercial driver who commits a first DUI while driving any vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for at least one year. If, however, the driver was transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is at least three years. A commercial driver in South Dakota who commits a second DUI while driving any vehicle will have his or her commercial license revoked for life, which may or may not be reduced to a period of not less than 10 years.

Drivers Under 21

A person under 21 who commits a first DUI in South Dakota faces up to 30 days imprisonment in a county jail, a fine of up to $500, or both. For a first offense, the driver's license suspension period is 30 days. For a second offense, the suspension period is 180 days. For a third or subsequent offense, the suspension period is one year.

Dram Shop

The South Dakota legislature found that it is the drinking of alcohol, rather than the serving of alcohol, that causes an intoxicated person to injure another. Therefore, there is no dram shop liability in South Dakota.

Criminal Liability for Sale of Alcohol to Persons Under 21 and to Obviously Intoxicated Persons

It is a crime for a licensed drinking establishment to serve alcohol to a person under 21 or to an obviously intoxicated person. Offenders face up to one year imprisonment in a county jail, a fine of up to $2,000, or both.

Criminal Liability for Providing Alcohol to a Person 18 but Under 21

It is a crime to sell or give alcohol to a person who is 18 but under 21. Violators face up to 30 days imprisonment in a county jail, a fine of up to $500, or both.

Criminal Liability for Providing Alcohol to a Person Under 18

It is a crime to sell or give alcohol to a person who is under 18 in South Dakota. Offenders face up to one year imprisonment in a county jail, a fine of up to $2,000, or both.

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  • Alcohol is often uses as a social "lubricant" in order to make some drinkers feel more comfortable and relaxed around other people.
  • Acamprosate is a drug that has been marketed as being able to help alcoholics to sustain abstinence; it is reported to work on the glutamate system of the brain and is currently being made available in 37 countries throughout the world.
  • Alcohol is found in many beverages, also in many prescription and non-prescription drugs.
  • Individualized interventions have been utilized by colleges throughout the United States in order to help students that have alcohol abuse problems or are have become alcohol dependant; these interventions are delivered by counselors, peers, and resident advisors.